Category Archives: Infrastructure

City Journal 10 Blocks podcast: Cuomo’s Congestion Pricing Plan Gives Him Power Over NYC

Nicole Gelinas and Aaron Renn join Seth Barron to discuss recent developments in New York and Chicago.

In the first week of April, both cities marked milestones: Manhattan got the nation’s first congestion-pricing plan, courtesy of the state legislature, while Chicago elected its first black woman as mayor.

New York City’s transit system badly needs improvement, but Gelinas argues that this congestion-pricing plan is effectively a state money grab. Meantime, Mayor-Elect Lori Lightfoot is a political outsider, but Renn writes that she has an opportunity to change the “Chicago Way” of doing business.

Read more at http://10blocks.libsyn.com/congestion-pricing-in-new-york-a-new-mayor-in-chicago#TTsVF6oz8qqo3GUI.99

https://www.city-journal.org/cuomo-congestion-pricing-plan

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City Journal 10 Blocks podcast: How Markets Shape Cities

Urbanist Alain Bertaud joins Michael Hendrix to discuss how urban planners and economists can improve city management.

Bertaud’s book Order without Design: How Markets Shape Cities argues that markets provide the indispensable mechanism for cities’ growth. The book is a summation of what Bertaud has learned in a lifetime spent as an urban planner, including a stint at the World Bank, where he advised local and national governments on urban-development policies.

Previously, Bertaud worked as a resident urban planner in a number of cities around the world: Bangkok, San Salvador, Port Au Prince, Sana’a, New York, Paris, Tlemcen, and Chandigarh. He is currently a senior research scholar at New York University’s Marron Institute of Urban Management.

 

https://www.city-journal.org/how-markets-shape-cities

 

Open Source with Christopher Lydon: The Bauhaus in Your House

Bauhaus was the art school in Germany that created the look of the twentieth century. We just live in it: loving its white-box affordability, or hating its stripped, blank, glass-and-steel uniformity, the world around. It’s the IKEA look in the twenty-first century, the look of Chicago skyscrapers and now Chinese housing towers, the look of American kitchens and probably the typeface on your emails, all derived from the building school in Germany between the world wars. It was the first omni-art school that taught painting and architecture, made new-look tapestries and chairs. It was the less-is-more school that made ornament very nearly a crime. It stood, and stands, for a few big ideas still hotly contested.

Source: The Bauhaus in Your House – Open Source with Christopher Lydon

City Journal 10 Blocks podcast: China’s Troubled Urban Future

Joel Kotkin joins Seth Barron to discuss China’s urbanization, class tensions in Chinese cities, and the country’s increasingly sophisticated population surveillance.

Rapid migration from China’s countryside to its cities began in 1980. Many of the rural migrants arrived without hukou, or residential permits, making it harder to secure access to education, health care, and other services. The result: the creation of a massive urban underclass in many Chinese cities. Rising tensions in urban areas has led Chinese officials to look to technology for alternative methods of social control, ranging from facial-recognition systems to artificial intelligence.

https://www.city-journal.org/chinas-urban-future