Category Archives: America Incognita

The fringes, the factions and the disintegrating center of these United States.

Watch “Hypermodernity with John David Ebert and Brian Francis Culkin” on YouTube

In their new book, Hypermodernity & The End of the World, John David Ebert, Brian Francis Culkin and Michael Aaron Kamins map out the cartography of Hypermodernity, an epoch which the authors demarcate as having come into being in 1995 with the advent of the Internet. As they travel across the digital medial landscape, the authors discuss the transformations wrought by Hypermodernity across the domains of economics, politics, art, film, literature and culture generally. The deworlding of the human individual by computational technologies wed together with neoliberal capitalism is discussed in great detail, as well as the rise of the avataric subject, pandemic narcissism, the ominous significance of Donald Trump, data mining by privateers, the dissolution of community, the erosion of cultural values and the eclipsing of the human by the Abyss—it’s all in here, the first ever thorough discussion of the implications of Hypermodernity as a structurally distinct epoch from Modernity and Postmodernity. So buy your ticket, step right up, strap on your seatbelt, and get ready for a wild ride.

 

American Mind Podcast: The Roundtable Episode #9. Everyone’s talking about coronavirus, but these are not your grandma’s takes. Staring into the void, our editors contemplate the deep mysteries and regime ramifications of an unprecedented crisis.

American Mind Podcast: The Roundtable Episode #9

Everyone’s talking about coronavirus, but these are not your grandma’s takes. Staring into the void, our editors contemplate the deep mysteries and regime ramifications of an unprecedented crisis.

The American Mind’s ‘Editorial Roundtable’ podcast is a weekly conversation with Matt Peterson, James Poulos, David Bahr, and Spencer Klavan devoted to uncovering the ideas and principles that drive American political life. Stream here or download from your favorite podcast host.

Notes from Quarantine | The Roundtable Episode #9

Everyone’s talking about coronavirus, but these are not your grandma’s takes. Staring into the void, our editors contemplate the deep mysteries and regime ramifications of an unprecedented crisis.

Nation on Lockdown | The Roundtable Episode 9, Segment 1, Beginning at 2:24

Does a fragile and decadent society have the resources to deal with a pandemic? Our editors consider new ways of living and old ways of thinking that seem poised to emerge from weeks spent indoors with family.

Faith or Imagination? | The Roundtable Episode 9, Segment 2, Beginning at 27:15

Globalism, office work, and the ivy leagues: the virus may reveal that all of these are past their sell-by date. But on a deeper level, plague and fears of plague evoke the uneasy spectre of a higher power. As Facebook’s A.I. fails spectacularly, our false certainties come crashing down around us.

Existential Realignment | The Roundtable Episode 9, Segment 3, Beginning at 56:42

Biden rolls over Bernie like a train, yet no one cares. At long last, politics is not the most important thing—but what is?

American Mind Podcast: The Roundtable Episode #9

Source: American Mind Podcast: The Roundtable Episode #9 – The American Mind

The Ezra Klein show: Are you a “political hobbyist”? If so, you may be the problem.

Obsessively following the daily political news feels like an act of politics, or at least an act of civics. But what if, for many of us, it’s a replacement for politics — and one that’s actually hurting the country?

That is the argument made by Tufts University political scientist Eitan Hersh in this episode of The Ezra Klein Show. In his incisive new book Politics Is for Power, Hersh draws a sharp distinction between what he calls “political hobbyism” — following politics as a kind of entertainment and expression of self-identity — and the actual work of politics. His data show that a lot of people who believe they are doing politics are passively following it, and the way they’re following it has played a key role in making the political system worse.

But this isn’t just a critique. Hersh’s argument builds to an alternative way of engaging in politics: as a form of service to our institutions and communities. And that alternative approach leads to some dramatically different ideas about how to marry an interest in politics with a commitment to building a better world. It also speaks to some of what we lost in rejecting the political machines and transactional politics of yesteryear — a personal obsession of mine and a more important hinge point in American political history than I think we realize.

We are, as you may have noticed, deep into election season, and that’s when it’s easiest to mistake the drama of national politics for the doing of actual politics. So there’s no better time for this conversation.

 

https://www.vox.com/2020/3/11/21172064/politics-is-for-power-eitan-hersh-the-ezra-klein-show

 

 

Free Thoughts podcast: Overdoing Democracy (with Robert Talisse)

Democracy can be a good thing, but if forced into places and situations where it fits poorly, like a Thanksgiving dinner, then maybe we should rethink its limits. We discuss the nature and purpose of democracy and whether democratic politics is an end in itself or whether democracy exists for a purpose with Robert Talisse.

Is it possible to have too much democracy? Does too much democracy damage the very goals for which we have democracy in the first place? How has our partisanship seeped in to other areas of our lives?

 

https://www.libertarianism.org/podcasts/free-thoughts/overdoing-democracy

Making Sense Podcast #188 : Paul Bloom speak about the virtues of President Trump, the campaign prospects of Bloomberg and Sanders, the asymmetrical norms of the Democratic and Republican parties, the marginal role that parents play in the development of their children, wealth inequality and the breakdown of the nuclear family, whether Paul should take LSD, the deplatforming of Peter Singer, and other topics.

In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris and Paul Bloom speak about the virtues of President Trump, the campaign prospects of Bloomberg and Sanders, the asymmetrical norms of the Democratic and Republican parties, the marginal role that parents play in the development of their children, wealth inequality and the breakdown of the nuclear family, whether Paul should take LSD, the deplatforming of Peter Singer, and other topics.

https://samharris.org/podcasts/188-february-28-2020/